STATISTICAL INCOMPETENCE
of europe's top politicians overlast 25 years beggars belief- now killing people through poorly designed random testing of vaccines that delayed roll-out and adaptability to virus variation- previously multiplier of subprime unemployment, destruction of livelihoods at europe borders inside outside eu, destroying a place's peoples opportunity to invest in either relative advantages or their own most entrepreneurial data mapmakers- to discuss rsvp chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk - co-organised under 30s cop26 andtenth yearof adam smith scholars journal..


EUROPE:
Albania, Andorra, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia,
Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland,
Italy, Kosovo, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, North Macedonia, Malta, Moldova, Monaco, Montenegro,
Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden,Switzerland, (Turkey), Ukraine, United Kingdom, Vatican City
.
SPECIAL THANKS 2020 TO EUROPE'S LIVESMATTER.CITY coalition: barcelona rome oxford-glasgow vienna geneva ...q1 when vaccine is born how can it be marketed so 7.5 billion ;;livesmatter? q2 from zoomuni.net- how can students and teachers help celebrate advancing sdgs on 75th year of UN
The Economist's entrepreneurial revolutions 49th annual league table of places sees barcelona and vienna playing most critical roles as tipping points of sdgs collapse unless we get back to understanding 90% of innovations advancing human lot start small deep and long in communi8ty or family lab not 90 day extraction mba thrones.
timelines of worldclassbrands -what if purpose of brand leaders will exponentially determine success or failure of our final 40 year examination in species sustainability -launched in 1988 with a series in the economist - year of brand, death of brand manager- what needed to die as the world united around death of distance technolgues was the advertising paradim of battling for minds with a different brand for every new product and in every different language- what would be the mos importnant new geres of brands? places? faiths? big data local platforms - how would adam smith and james watt quarter of a century 1760-2010 morph into humanising moore machine intel than human as we entered 4G and 5G decades: back in 1960s alumni of moore had promised 100 times more computation power every decade 0g 1970s onwards - thats an exponential of trillion times moore by end of 2030 than needed to code moon landing- such power depended on trust in collaboration around globalistion's most purposeful brand leaders as well as integration of community sized enterprise value chains if sustainabity golals were to be a united reality not just a greenwashing game
universityofstars -what if world class sporting leagues prepped uber champoins- once you're too old to stay top of the pops in sports song or beauty, what if you already know an sdg leader you want to share your and her alumni with
-launched 2004 in delhi with 100- gandhians after seeing some early reality tv competitions as well as writing up 184's story of the critical deadlines of morphing digital and pre-digital media to be the sustainably deepest of both not the socially most trivial -more
27 years of statistical incompetence of euro political leaders beggars belief and will be increasingly deadly - to discuss covid crises, fake banking, fake pece at borders, misvaluation of exponential risks, devil-takes hindmost policies impacting europe's youth rsvp cris.macrae@YAHOO.CO.UK SUBJECT DEADLY POLITICIANS ...Fascinating to track with hudson institute how many european countries have given up with the official advice of mr trump on building g5 and are letting carriers just do it with whomever offers the best deal washington dc technology's biggest leap -breaking 14 nov - many nations and continents are racing into 2020s with probably the biggest innovation crisis ever du8e to greed of governments spectrum auctions at $G #G- failure to let the peoples use 5g video would 5G exist without china -discussion welcome chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk. 1957 JON VON NEUMANN - THE WORLD AND HUNGARIAN AMERUCANS MOST VALUABLE MATHS BRAIN DIES LEAVING AN IMMEDIATE LEGACY OF MOON RACING AND TWO AI LABS -ATLANTIC COAST FACING OUT OF IT BOSTON, PACIFIC CIAST FACING OUT OF STANFORD
1955 EU CONCEIVED MESSINA - TWO MAIN PURPOSES REVIEWED HERE
1945 COLONIAL INDUSTRIAL AGE EMPIRES COLLAPSE IN WORLD WARS BUT HOPEFUL BIRTH OF UNITED NATIONS
1066 & ALL THAT - FRANCE IS LAST OF MILLENNIUM OF CATHOLICS ON CONTINENT INVADING BRITAIN....
.A MATHEMATICAL HISTORY OF EUROPE & COMMONWEALTH
2021 AI TAKES OVER FROM MACRECONOMIC mess IN EU & UK- ON MIDDLE WEEKEND COP26, SATURDAY NOV 6: GLASGOW UNIVERSITY UNION, students ROAD TEST ALL POLITICIANS ON WHAT ADAM SMITH SAID ABOUT LIVES MATTER TO FIRST 260 YEARS OF MAN AND MACHINES. BBC MAKES PERMANENT RECORDING FOR BROADCAST AND DIGITAL VIRALISATION ADDING IN GREEN FUTURE CELEBRATIONS BY ATTENBOROUGH ET AL

1965 JAPANESE CALCULATORS AND INTEL CHIPS TAKEOVER FROM CRUNCHING NUMBERS BY SLIDE-RULERS- DISMALLY ECONOMISTS OF SHORT-TERM NUMEROLOGY TAKE OVER FROM ECONOMISTS AS MEDIATORS OF WIN-WIN SYSTEM DESIGNS


Sunday, February 11, 2001

20 years on

 

https://twitter.com/gsdebinski

We're still not where we want to be," European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen said this week about the European Union's sluggish vaccine rollout. It was a sort of concession from the EU chief, who's been criticized for overseeing a bungled inoculation rollout in the world's largest trading bloc.

To date, around four percent of the bloc's population has been vaccinated, compared to 13 percent in the US, and 20 percent in the UK.

Why has the EU rollout been so slow, and what does this mean for Europe and its politics?

Stronger together? EU states are usually responsible for their own public health policies, but the 27-member bloc shifted course last summer by deciding to procure vaccines as a single bloc. While this approach prevents larger and richer countries (Germany, France) from buying up all the stock and leaving smaller and poorer ones (Bulgaria, Romania) behind, the process has been a bureaucratic and logistical nightmare.

For starters, before it could ink a deal with a pharma company, the Commission had to hold lengthy negotiations, and wait for individual EU countries to sign the contract separately. Hampered by political machinations, the back-and-forth took months, costing the bloc precious time.

The EU's vaccine procurement strategy also appears to have slowed things down. Focused on obtaining drugs at the lowest cost, Brussels — which signed a deal with AstraZeneca two months after the UK did — bargained with drug companies while other governments pursued a whatever-it takes strategy, buying up the jabs first.

When asked about the speedy vaccine rollout in Israel, for instance, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said, we "did not quibble about the price of vaccines." Of course, Israel only had to secure vaccines for 9 million people, compared to the EU's 450 million. Still, during a deadly pandemic, a seven day negotiation delay can result in a large number of deaths.

Aversion to risk. The EU made clear from the start that it was not going to rush the vaccine regulatory approval process. While the US, Canada, Britain and others were willing to give speedy emergency authorizations for use — often bypassing traditional clinical trial protocols — the EU took an unhurried approach, authorizing the Pfizer vaccine on December 21, three weeks after the UK. This was further complicated by supply shortages, with pharma companies reneging on commitments made to the EU.

The Union also has other challenges to contend with. In France, home to a large anti-vaccine movement, some 60 percent of adults recently said they would not get a COVID jab, compromising France's bid to reach herd immunity. Compare that to the US, where 67 percent of residents now say they'll get vaccinated.

These factors complicate the EU's efforts to get back to normal anytime soon. It's no small feat that last summer the bloc passed a 750 billion euro coronavirus relief package, where for the first time, all EU countries agreed to share the financial burden of rescuing some members. (Compare that with the responses of EU governments to the sovereign debt crisis that followed the US global financial market meltdown and migrant crisis in 2015-2016.)

But those funds can only go so far in aiding Europe's economic recovery. Tourism-dependent economies (think Greece, Portugal, and Spain) need to reopen soon to avoid worsening economic crises, and that's not going to happen until most EU residents — 20 percent of whom are over the age of 65 — and visitors alike are protected from COVID-19.

Was this shortfall unavoidable considering the enormous task at hand? Mujtaba Rahman, Europe practice head at Eurasia Group, our parent company, says this outcome "definitely was not inevitable; more the result of several tactical missteps made by both the Commission and the member states." Rahman predicts "a reckoning" post-COVID "just as there was in the aftermath of the Greek debt crisis."

Who's filling the gap? Naturally, Russia and China are eager to help. Hungary, an EU member state often at odds with Brussels that has repeatedly criticized the bloc-wide procurement process, has bypassed Brussels by approving Russia's Sputnik V vaccine for use, and sealing a deal with Chinese-owned Sinopharm. Will other EU states follow suit?

The trade-off: The European Commission has prioritized European unity ahead of vaccine nationalism. This has clearly delayed the bloc's pandemic response. But how will voters in wealthy EU countries respond when they next go to the polls? Will they agree with Euroskeptic parties that EU unity was not worth the botched outcome? Only time will tell.


 

 
 
 

The strength of global democracy was tested by the coronavirus in 2020 — and COVID mostly won. The Economist Intelligence Unit's Global Democracy Index fell last year by an average 0.07 points, the biggest drop since the annual ranking was first compiled in 2006. Government-imposed restrictions on individual freedoms and civil liberties due to the pandemic are partly responsible for the decline, and this is true for a majority of countries regardless of how well they managed the pandemic. We take a look at how democracy performed in 2020 in the 10 countries that handled the pandemic best and in the 10 with the worst responses, as measured by the Lowy Institute.


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