EUROPE: Albania, Andorra, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Kosovo, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, North Macedonia, Malta, Moldova, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, (Turkey), Ukraine, United Kingdom, Vatican City...SPECIAL THANKS 2020 TO EUROPE'S LIVESMATTER.CITY coalition: barcelona rome oxford-glasgow vienna
2020q1 when vaccine is born how can it be marketed so 7.5 billion
livesmatter?
2020q2 from zoomuni.net- how can students and teachers help celebrate advancing sdgs on 75th year of UN

The Economist's entrepreneurial revolutions 49th annual league table of places sees barcelona and vienna playing most critical roles as tipping points of sdgs collapse unless we get back to understanding 90% of innovations advancing human lot start small deep and long in communi8ty or family lab not 90 day extraction mba thrones. Hong MOng takes over as startup epicentral in spite of western fake media to contrary
timelines of
worldclassbrands -what if purpose of brand leaders will exponentially determine success or failure of our final 40 year examination in species sustainability -launched in 1988 with a series in the economist - year of brand, death of brand manager- what needed to die as the world united around death of distance technolgues was the advertising paradim of battling for minds with a different brand for every new product and in every different language- what would be the mos importnant new geres of brands? places? faiths? big data local platforms - how would adam smith and james watt quarter of a century 1760-2010 morph into humanising moore machine intel than human as we entered 4G and 5G decades: back in 1960s alumni of moore had promised 100 times more computation power every decade 0g 1970s onwards - thats an exponential of trillion times moore by end of 2030 than needed to code moon landing- such power depended on trust in collaboration around globalistion's most purposeful brand leaders as well as integration of community sized enterprise value chains if sustainabity golals were to be a united reality not just a greenwashing game

universityofstars -what if world class sporting leagues prepped uber champoins- once you're too old to stay top of the pops in sports song or beauty, what if you already know an sdg leader you want to share your and her alumni with
-launched 2004 in delhi with 100- gandhians after seeing some early reality tv competitions as well as writing up 184's story of the critical deadlines of morphing digital and pre-digital media to be the sustainably deepest of both not the socially most trivial -more

Fascinating to track with hudson institute how many european countries have given up with the official advice of mr trump on building g5 and are letting carriers just do it with whomever offers the best deal washington dc technology's biggest leap -breaking 14 nov - many nations and continents are racing into 2020s with probably the biggest innovation crisis ever du8e to greed of governments spectrum auctions at $G #G- failure to let the peoples use 5g video would 5G exist without china -discussion welcome chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk

Thursday, May 21, 2020

updating 7 years research on who helps pope francis most with service learning - related last mile health www.fazleabed.com alumni freire, alumni ban ki-moon global citizenry

research question- who works directly for pope francis top cardinal of service learning at vatican university and eg hosts the annual http://www.premiosciacca.it

dear catholic friends may 2020- are you or your friends able to go up the local catholic and alumni networks in barcelona or new york to see who knows him
i am not sure he will remember our meeting

basically in rome early 2015 i tried to ask who would be in charge of curriculum not pr consequences of papal visit to un and us at time of sdgs- there was some linguistic difficulties in trying to explain why i was asking- i also tried to ask club of rome how they connected gorbachev and soros back inn new york but didnt get a proper answer - my 3rd visit on trip which was supposed to be with the knowledge officer of the un food goal 2 epicentre in rome was cancelled at short notice due to illness of person concerned-at the time they claimed to be main grameen intel partner on agriculture a partnership yunus wasted in ways sir fazle would not have- prior to all this i had chatted to paul farmer for 30 minsat central european university and he explained what culture of accompaniment/freire meant to him and virus fighting last mile youth - but when i interviewed both georgetown and catholic uni chief experts on this they were not linked in to last mile health servants - something very messy happens in dc at the gap between politics and service of health let alone data needed to ai health

can i suggest doing a zoom if you need more details- a zoom hosted by carnegie ethics yesterday estimates virus will double people starving to death in next year

chris  whatsapp/text +1240316 8157 washington dc - nih suburb

----- Forwarded message -----
From: Bruno 
To: "chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk" <chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk>
Cc: "avvcircosta" <avvcircosta@gmail.com>; "natasacircosta" 
Sent: Friday, 13 February 2015, 03:34:49 GMT-5
Subject: R: dear ...

Molte grazie.

Da: christopher macrae [mailto:chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk]
Inviato: venerdì 13 febbraio 2015 04:20
A: bruno
Cc: Circostas; ; sunita gandhi
Oggetto: dear 



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Rebecca Winthrop discusses the commonalities between the religious and global education communities and translating their shared core values into practical solution...
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Many thanks for the extraordinary conversation  and your precious  time last Friday-  many interesting things have started to spiral since my return to DC


1) in parallel DC's senior open minded economics thinktank brookings has written about the Pope Francis and education- I know how to contact brookings leadership team if I can be of any use

2) the most exciting youth empowerment team across the Americas has invited Pope Francis to join in the heads of state and youth entrepreneurs summit in panama in second week of April; I know the people (led by a young Peruvian male and Colombian female) who animate all the youth networks who converge (12th year ) in panama- please say if you want me to introduce you to them. I left Antonio the brochure launched as one of top 10 key  sessions at World Bank Group President Kim and Pope Francis Discuss Mutual Efforts to End Povertyworld bank youth summit last October


3) Kenya's most resourced Catholic networker of women empowerment has started testing my friend's 5 billion person elearning satellite yazmi.com with support of Muhammad Yunus first female director  Naila Chowdhury of mobile "living with poorest" partnerships back in 1996 - if you would like a demonstration of 5 billion person elearning satellite at any time in Rome please say

If there is someone at Catholic University DC that you could recommend my friends contact first I would welcome any advice. I believe Catholic Universities around the world can develop curricula that no other university network will do in time to help youth be fully involved in race to end poverty by living and learning with the poorest

sincerely
chris macrae
===============================================

Rebecca Winthrop Brookings

Important Education Advocate?

 

Pope Francis waves as he leaves after visiting the parish of San Michele Archangelo in Rome February 8, 2015.
Last week I found myself in the Vatican, taking part in a series of meetings on education, global citizenship, and peaceful co-existence. As a non-Catholic, this was new territory for me. Prior to the meeting, the little I knew about the Catholic Church could be captured on a flashcard, a mini, cliff-notes version of history. It all started in the first century A.D. during the Roman Empire when Jesus appointed Saint Peter as the church's leader (the first pope), many centuries of expansion and conflict followed, the Protestant reformation then occurred in the 1500s, a strong tradition of education among the Jesuits contributed to schooling expansion globally, and today divisive debates rage around abortion and the role of women. I knew similarly little about the Church's teachings. And the protocol materials sent prior to the meetings, while helpful because at least I knew what was expected, only served to reinforce the sound bites about the Church that you hear on the news. Women are to wear "pants and skirts below the knees, colorless nails, hair up and neat, without cleavage, shoulders covered, no tight clothes, dark colors." 

Two Communities, One Human Family

Given my limited knowledge, I decided I should prepare for the meeting and luckily happened upon several articles about Catholic social teaching. In those pages, I discovered a very different Church than what usually makes the media headlines. The concepts of human dignity, human equality, the right of all people to fully participate in society, and hence the call to provide special protection to the poor and vulnerable and to act in the common good were all present. In many ways the principles and focus of Catholic social teaching are similar to those in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, perhaps the one document that has inspired me the most to work on issues related to global poverty. In both cases, there is the powerful idea that all people are part of one human family—no matter who you are, where you are from, what gender you are, or how rich or how poor. The origins of this idea are different, of course, with one relying on the belief that each person is created in the image of God (and hence we must treat everyone as we would treat the Lord) and the other skipping the divine altogether and starting with the belief in the inherent dignity of all people (and hence "the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family").  Here was, in my view, one of the best-kept secrets of the Catholic Church. 
The ideas in Catholic social teaching were essential in giving me a frame of reference for my discussions at the Vatican. The meetings last week were convened by Scholas Occurentes, an Argentinian non-profit founded by Pope Francis when he was the Archbishop of Buenos Aires, and dedicated to connecting schools around the world in an effort to foster inter-cultural dialogue. Now, with Pope Francis sitting in Rome, the organization is seeking to broaden its scope, become more global, and take an ecumenical approach to the issues around global citizenship that Pope Francis has stated he wishes to continue to champion. Supporting the poor and vulnerable, focusing on human dignity and equality, ensuring everyone is part of and fully participating in society, were all principles strongly reflected in this work, as with much of the pope's actions throughout his life, and in Pope Francis's message at the meeting.  "We will not change the world, if we do not change education," said the pope. Teachers must be honored, he went on, for carrying the burden of educating our children virtually alone, but it is time that all members of society actively lend their support to this important responsibility. Ultimately, he laid out a social vision based on harmony (both within society and within oneself) to which the education of the world's young people should contribute.

If my trip to the Vatican taught me one thing it is that there is far more common ground between the religious and global education communities than first meets the eye. But how can Pope Francis and his team translate the core values we share into practical solutions for children and youth in developing countries? Here are my five recommendations:
1. Become a global education advocate. Global education, namely the focus on formal and non-formal learning opportunities in countries around the world, has been missing champions at the most senior level. This has been especially visible in the last 15 years as the global education community coalesced around trying to put all children in the world into primary school, the core of the education component of the United Nation's Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). As colleagues in the global health sector, an equally important area of work, mobilized Bill Gates, a host of celebrities, multiple U.N. special envoys, and billions of dollars in additional financing to meet the health-related MDGs, progress in global education was made mainly on the backs of the poorest countries in the world—many of whom extended considerable effort to do whatever they could in the face of difficult constraints to improve education for their children. Not surprisingly, today corporations give 16 times more to global health than to global education, and the health-focused global fund in its last replenishment campaign raised $12 billion while the education-focused global fund raised less than $2 billion. 
Only within the last two years has there been a growing global profile to the world's education issues with, among others, the appointment of former U.K. Prime Minister Gordon Brown as the first U.N. Special Envoy for Global Education, the First Lady of Qatar Sheika Moza's global initiative to put 10 million children into school, and former Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard's new role as the chair of the board of the Global Partnership for Education. 
Additional voices are certainly needed—to call on governments both rich and poor alike to do more, to encourage civil society and the private sector to include education as a priority for their service and giving, and to remind people that it is not just any education that will do but one that promotes the values of global citizenship. This last point, in particular, needs more attention. In what could serve as an excellent starting point for Pope Francis's global education messages, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki Moon recently issued a framework for education action that has three global priorities: 1) put every child into school, 2) improve quality learning, and 3) foster global citizenship.  In all of this Pope Francis could have an important role to play, as a leader who can pick up the phone to talk with any other heads of state, as an ethical voice in the debate, and as someone who can inspire people to act.  
2. Focus on the most marginalized. The commitment to the poor and the vulnerable takes on new meaning when moving from an Argentinian (or even Latin American) context to a global perspective. Virtually all children in Latin America have access to school, although the dropout rate at secondary school level is alarmingly high in some countries.  However, this is not the case globally.  There are 120 million children in the world who have no access to primary or junior secondary school at all, the majority of them are living in severe poverty in rural areas or unlucky enough to live in countries plagued by armed conflict.  There are also 130 million children around the world who are in schools of such poor quality that they are learning virtually nothing—after four years in school they have not mastered the very basics of reading, writing and math and are therefore at high risk of dropping out before the end of primary school.  While you will certainly find some of these children in Latin America, you will find many more spread across Africa, the Middle East and South Asia. 
These children and youth are the poorest of the poor globally and are in desperate need of programs, attention, and advocates on their behalf. Like their peers everywhere, they deserve an education that not only equips them with academic and workforce skills but also imparts a sense of community and a set of values reflecting global citizenship. To reach these young people, we cannot rely on the preferred approach used to date by the Scholas initiative of connecting students through computers in their classrooms (so many have no classrooms, and those that do certainly don't have access to the Internet or computers).  Rather, we need to focus on policies, programs, and interventions that bring learning to these young people, such as traveling teachers, homes and community centers doubling as schools for refugee children, and distance learning via mobile phones. Pope Francis and his team at Scholas have an important role to play in shining a spotlight on the needs of these forgotten children and driving action on their behalf. Any global citizenship initiative that does not include them in some way would seem to fly in the face of the basic principles in Catholic social teaching.    
3. Promote global citizenship within education systems. The competencies important for global citizenship—empathy, critical thinking, collaborating with others, respecting diversity, understanding inter-connectedness—can be fostered in numerous ways. One important way to help young people develop these competencies is through school systems. It is, after all, much easier to use policy and programs to try to affect change through the levers that education systems have—curriculum, teaching, text books, classroom environment—than through, for example, trying to change behavior inside the family.

There has been much work over the years by educators and social activists who seek to cultivate global citizenship competencies through education.  From this work, we know that extra-curricular activities around global citizenship issues (e.g., a school club, a community service project, a day of awareness) are important and can be useful avenues to engage young people. However, if these after-school activities give different messages than what the schools themselves give, their impact is greatly diminished. For example, if children spend all day in a school where the curriculum has explicit messages about the inferiority of women to men, teachers regularly call on boys over girls, and female teachers are the only ones responsible for cleaning the school grounds, then an afterschool activity on gender equality will likely not deliver major results.  Ensuring that education systems both embody the values of global citizenship in their core business of teaching and learning as well as promote engagement in extra-curricular activities on the topic is an important avenue for social change.  Colombia, Scotland, Korea, and Kenya are all countries that are actively prioritizing this work in their education systems. Building on, amplifying and spreading these existing efforts to new countries could be an important role for Pope Francis and his team.
4. Mobilize multiple voices in society. In addition to using the levers of change available in education systems, influential figures in society have an important role to play in spreading the message about global citizenship.  From music stars and sports celebrities to CEOs and politicians—all have a sphere of influence that can be leveraged towards the values of global citizenship. Role models in society can have powerful influence over young people and having them engage in activities that demonstrate global citizenship competencies can be equally as influential as having them speak about the issues. This is an area in which the Pope and his team at Scholas are already heavily engaged and it certainly is an area of comparative advantage given the celebrity of Pope Francis himself.  
5. Lean-in on the Catholic education tradition.  In many parts of the world, and especially in developing countries, Catholic schools have made a significant contribution to expanding mass education and giving some of the poorest communities access to a quality education. The large network of Catholic schools is an important player—particularly in areas where neither governments nor the Church alone can solve the education problems. These networks, and the 1.2 billion Catholics around the world, are an important asset in the effort to cultivate global citizenship competencies. They can be encouraged not only to continue their work but also to reach out to the non-Catholic community on issues of global citizenship and the support of public education systems writ large.

For those who care about these issues, and particularly for those who have spent years working on education and advancing notions of global citizenship, the idea that Pope Francis and his team at Scholas Occurentes may play a more globally active role in this movement will be welcome news indeed. Regardless of one’s spiritual persuasion, global citizenship is something we can all get behind.

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